Bank Failures Coming To A Branch Near You

By: Tom Chatham

The U.S. banking system has been in defacto default since 2008. But since everyone needs U.S. dollars to continue commerce around the world it has been put on delay. Everyone has been playing lets pretend. That will not last much longer. The events in Cyprus tell volumes about what is coming to other nations around the world.

As the banks tumble in domino fashion around the world everyone will head for the U.S. as the last safe place to store money. That may be by design. Once in the U.S those assets may have no safe place else to go so they will be essentially trapped. It will be a tempting target for the bankers and politicians to loot. A collapse then could force everyone into a one world currency. But not everyone wants to play with that marked deck.

The BRICS nations just held a meeting in South Africa and one of the things they discussed was the formation of a BRICS equivalent of the IMF and World Bank. They want to establish their own bank to aid emerging economies and they have agreed in principle to collectively finance it with a 100 billion contingency reserve arrangement for starters. These nations have a lot of gold and are increasing supplies as fast as possible. It is likely this new bank will be financed with gold backed currencies at some point. That will give the IMF crooks a lot of heartburn. It may also be the spark that ignites another world war.

The western bankers cannot afford to have a competing currency to anything they create so some type of action will be forthcoming. If people were able to shield their money from the corrupt bankers by moving it to another currency or bank out of the western bankers control it would prevent their plans to force through a one world currency which they would control. It always comes back to they money doesn’t it.

What would stop someone from moving large amounts of money from the U.S. to a BRICS bank? How about the imposing of capitol controls after all of that money is here. That seems likely. And if you are thinking of pulling that money out of the bank and hiding it under your mattress consider this. If a bank holiday is declared in the U.S. they can close the banks on say Friday night and reopen on Monday morning after having locked you out of your accounts all weekend while taking a “fair” percentage for the national good. But it might not stop there.

Suppose after you regain access to your accounts you find they have also devalued the dollar by 20 or 30 percent. They may just forgo the actual theft of money and devalue alone. In any case, they will have succeeded in stealing a large percentage of your money even if it were not in the bank.

I can’t tell you what to do but I don’t keep any more than a weeks worth of operating funds in my account and only about 30 to 60 days worth of cash on hand. Everything else I have is in highly liquid forms like silver. If they pull this I would take my cash on hand and go shopping that weekend before they have a chance to devalue. That would limit my losses and put me ahead of the general population. But that’s just me.

What would you buy in a crunch like this? Anything you can use to take care of yourself. It might be impossible to buy anything on line or through wire transfers but with cash you might visit coin shops, pawn shops, local merchants or look on craigslist for things worth something to you or for later trade. If you need to “store” money why not do so in gold and silver coins, a good used wood stove, a generator or possibly in extra fuel storage. All of these things will become much more expensive after a devaluation.

And always remember, if it isn’t in your direct possession you don’t own it. This will become brutally obvious to those with safety deposit boxes in the future. When they finally pull the plug on U.S. banks you should consider anything you have inside the bank as lost. If you get anything at all back consider yourself lucky. If you keep these things in mind it might not be as painful when it happens. Good fortune favors the prepared mind.

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Posted on April 2, 2013, in Economics and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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